Posts from the ‘International’ Category

Love Fiercely. Love Fearlessly …

A demonstrator protesting the shooting death of Alton Sterling is detained by law enforcement near the headquarters of the Baton Rouge Police Department in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S. July 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

A demonstrator protesting the shooting death of Alton Sterling is detained by law enforcement near the headquarters of the Baton Rouge Police Department in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S. July 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

 

‘’Anything we love can be saved.’’ (Alice Walker)

‘’Witches have a saying – where there’s fear, there’s power.’’ (Starhawk)


Globally, things are serious right now. Problematic life and times, with more complexities in the post, in the years ahead. Many karmic chickens coming home on a micro and macrocosmic level – as personal, planetary and galactic evolution enters a crucial phase – it’s as though we’ve left the womb and are in the birth canal and it’s fairly uncomfortable. We are challenged to remember that our psycho-spiritual faculties are wondrously powerful. Apparently we only use about 6% of our capability. Whether or not we engage in protest or demonstration we can also do a lot in the subtle, energetic dimensions to augment/compliment all of the necessary 3D actions that we make.

This is about 2 things: (a) the urgent necessity of having a concrete spiritual/energetic framework or practice in your life and (b) long-term thoughts I have had about different layers of oppression in society and ways to effect change in the power balance. Reinforced by lucid dreams and visions that I have had that show the energetic equivalent of everything that happens here and the power of fear to control people. What do we do about those who choose to take up arms and oppress fellow citizens on behalf of the state? I’m taking mainly about racist police, private security firms, detention centre guards, companies that manufacture weapons and torture devices – and those who then use them.

The latest wave of racist police brutality in the US has shocked and sickened me. Since about 2014 there seems to be something akin to demonic possession going on in US law enforcement. It’s not a new thing, but the immediacy of cell phone reportage by civilians, is bringing the information home on a daily basis. I am saddened and disgusted by it and disturbed by the lack of political outrage from the international community. At the same time – inspired, because random and organised acts of bravery, leadership and community are now everywhere.

What used to be the official political ‘alternative’, is now an international groundswell of anti-authoritarian, anti-elite grassroots majority, who want social justice, equality, welfare, education, civil rights, clean energy, healthcare and respect for the environment. Also an end to bogus ‘austerity’ measures, an end to sexism, racism, homophobia and fascism of all kinds. This drive for a fairer world now seems global. Our governmental, economic and military/industrial complexes are hanging on by a thread of ideological credibility – which is manifesting in panic and brute force. No-one wants war anymore, except a tiny handful of profiteers. Information on how to create a new society is here and we can do it. It’s possible that the new self-governing structures of the future are being born in the protest movements of today.

Authors Octavia Butler, (dystopian but visionary science fiction) Suzanne Collins (Hunger Games) and Starhawk (author, witch and activist), have written fiction that foresees a dystopian future that necessitates super-human levels of courage from a defiant population. Such books are arguably, a blueprint for a revolution, though they may not have been intended as such. Anyone following the news in America, will have seen acts of protest that are shamanic in scope – the lone woman in a dress (pictured above, later identified as Leshia Evans from Brooklyn) confronting heavily armoured riot police, the man with the sign that says, ‘’We may have to die for this’’ (he knows and is ready) or Diamond Reynolds as she live-streamed the murder of Philando Castile as both her battery and he were dying. Deeds of self-possession, dignity and strength that shame both the police and those whose complicity allows the system to exist.

Here’s something that I urge people to do. You might not be able to participate physically in all the amazing intersectional challenges to authority that are happening. (Here are some them. Please visit their websites and social media streams for links to further resources and info. Black Lives Matter, OccupyStand Up To RacismMovement for Justice, Revolutionary Communist Group, Black Dissidents, Million Women Rise.)

But EVERYONE in these times can and should have a spiritual strategy. An ability to call on transpersonal, higher power. Call it what you will, but it needs to be on speed dial and well practised. Now is the time to have some sort of energetic discipline – not just a vague inclination, but a regime. This can include meditation, prayer, shamanic journeying, martial arts, kickboxing, Tai Chi or, whatever. There’s loads to choose from and something for everyone. Have something that trains your mind, body and spirit to endure, transcend and transform.

We know that first, we need to send love to the victims and survivors of the brutality …

Next, try this: I’ve long had a theory that the power dynamic would be utterly transformed if the people who joined the armed forces, police, prison guards, detention centre guards etc – could be encouraged to choose other routes. The elite needs automatons to do the dirty work and without them, would fail. Imagine a world where there were no more workers left to build tasers, electric batons, handcuffs, shackles, guns or bullets. No police left to wear helmets, boots and shields and no-one bothering to manufacture such things. No armies and no-one interested in joining them. I believe that focused intention can target this group of people. The power of prayer, magical intent and visualisation, IS REAL. Anyone who uses these techniques on a regular basis can attest that results can be profound in ways that transcend both place and time. Fear can be melted. Ignorance can be infiltrated with light. People (everything in fact) are nothing but fast vibrating energy and reality can be altered. Dare to reach in and alter it. 

As you go about your daily regime of whatever it is – take time to light a candle, run to your favourite spot on a high hill, gaze into the fire, or a bowl of water, or go deep into prayer, or trance. Spend a good, long intentional moment – anything from 10 mins to an hour – sending a fierce wave of loving containment towards lost and ignorant souls within the police and army. Start somewhere – anywhere – and know that it’s time well spent. (I’m feeling particularly motivated about the Black Lives Matter movement and US police brutality but there are other situations that need attention, too.) There are instances of police breaking down in tears when confronted with protestors holding up mirrors or offering flowers. If it can happen just once, to one individual – it’s possible. Make your visualisation real, with full production, sound, colour, light, the works. I find holding a crystal that has profound colour energy – especially rose or deep pink, helps. Once you’ve got the picture up and running, use your mind to melt it and kelp melting until the whole frame is suffused and the structure starts to transform. Be uncompromising. Be unrelenting. Go deeper and deeper in and MELT the picture …

If people were to do this in large numbers and then synchronised with others, the results might be surprising. 

Am I saying we have to love everyone and just offer virtual hugs to racists until they are healed? No. I am under no illusions. With regard to America specifically, it’s a systemically violent gun culture based on conquest and slavery. Police officers are trained like robots assassins, with racially biased arrest quotas that make sure the prisons are filled and plenty of money is being made through fines and spurious traffic violations and unbelievably, even ‘walking whilst black’  – baggy, low slung trousers – offences. (Yes, that is a real thing by the way – check out Reggie Yates recent Ferguson documentary.)

Thoughts about the ultimate nature of evil are possibly beyond the scope of this particular piece of writing. Where violence occurs, certain non-human energies feed and they can’t just be hippie-hugged and healed with rainbows, especially if there is no thread or connection to any kind of emotional spectrum. And terms of protest, we still have to put our bodies on the streets and fight for justice.

But there is hope. Love can win. ‘Light’ – as brilliantly defined by Pleiadean channeller and writer Barbara Marciniak, as INFORMATION, can win. Some police officers and soldiers (not all) started off believing that they were actually serving and protecting. That too, is love and if there is even a spark left of that, it can be used in this type of visualisation.

So … give it a try. Human minds and hearts are powerful. Let’s use them.


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A Woman’s Worth…

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(The picture is of Norma Jean Wofford, also known as ‘The Duchess’ – lead guitarist with Bo Diddley from ’62-’66. She doesn’t appear in the book I’m talking about here, but this image goes very well with my blog post title. There were dozens of artists that I could have envisaged in the project. Would I like to see Giving Birth to Sound volume II and III and beyond? Yes.  Also a CD compilation and a dedicated music festival? You bet. I’m dreaming big…)

This post is about the worth and significance of musicians – female ones in particular – our capacity as story-tellers, mediums, healers, visionaries, agitators, collaborators entertainers and communicators. Every week, I am still riding the wave of momentum generated by ‘Giving Birth To Sound’ – the new book by Cologne jazz publisher Buddy’s Knife. With a foreword by legendary jazz pianist Amina Claudine Myers and featuring 48 female musicians – including myself. Over a year ago, I was approached by the editor, Renate da Rin. Would I like to be interviewed for a book about female musicians in jazz and creative music? I was up for it of course, and now suddenly the book has arrived and it’s an absolute dream. I am honoured and happy to be sitting side by side with some of my influences and industry legends. A rich collection of personal histories and records of incredible achievement. The contributions have all been translated into English but each artist tells of a very personal relationship to sound, with a diverse range of nationalities, cultures, languages and instrumentation.

All the artists in the book are receiving our copies at different times and reading the final creation at different paces. Needless to say, with a sense of unfolding wonder and high hopes for further contact and projects. This feels unstoppable! For my part, I feel determined to draw attention to what has been achieved here and why it’s important. Despite distinct differences in age, race, language, education and geography, attitude to music, society and concepts of ‘womanhood’, there are common themes amongst the participants – which speak volumes about the times we are living in. An awareness of injustice, a recognition of global inequality and an economic climate where poverty is being demonised and money worshipped, the natural world being destroyed. A recognition that things are in some ways worse not better. A proud, fearless independence, but love of collaboration. An almost mystical, ecstatic reverie that comes from the creative process. Early exposure not just to musical stimulus, but to the worlds of the imagination. A generous passion and hope for the music above all – often expressed in words that are non-linear, poetic, idiomatic and rhapsodic. The book actually reads like a piece of music itself.

Women and girls have been told so many times that we can’t do stuff – either that we’re weak, incompetent and decorative … or in other periods of history and geography, that we are only good for sex, childcare, menial labour and social scapegoating, physical/emotional punchbags, with no access to self-improvement. I don’t say that lightly. In some areas, women have lower status than a domestic animal. Though happily, neither extreme is my own personal experience – the reality of worldwide abuse of women and girls is now so widely known about, that the concept of  female emancipation can no longer be ridiculed as some special interest feminist minority issue. It’s affecting the gender which is actually the majority. So it brings me joy when I see initiatives that really celebrate women. Our stories need to be heard. Some of them are shocking.

 (Here’s what I wrote to the editors:)

”The more I read of the book, the more I am blown away, with love and inspiration, heart quakes and shakes, tears of solidarity and empathy and also a fair bit of socio-political outrage. Today, reading the story of the musician who was accused as a child of being a liar – (TWICE) as her work was so advanced they didn’t believe it was hers… (this happened to me at school, with a play I wrote.)”  * I remember too, after a performance at the Isle of Wight Jazz festival, being approached by the (drunk) director of another prominent UK jazz festival. He accused me of not being the author of my own songs, which he threatened to  research and expose as classic standards which I had in fact plagiarised. Talk about a compliment and insult at the same time. I later received an apology …

 (I also wrote this to the editors:)

”I have to say, a book, (so much more than just a ‘book’) of this nature could not have happened at this time in the UK. We’re beset here with a governmental drive towards austerity that is unbelievable. But there are valiant pockets of rebellion and creativity resourcefulness, generosity and people-power all the more amazing, as we are operating against the odds here. A common theme amongst some of the contributors seems to be the increasing punishment of the poor and of poverty by government and media, affecting all artists – so maybe this economic trend is worldwide. BUT I am so thankful to you creative jazz loving folks at Buddys Knife – for your intellectual courage, determination and artistic integrity in doing this project.
Each one of these 48 contributors is not just a musical creator, but leader, visionary and dare I say it – shaman/sorcerer/witch/wizard/world-bridger and changer of epic proportions. Each with her own networks of international creativity. There are some global possibilities here. As with all creations – a mixture of strong desire/intent and a trust and ALLOWING… the inevitability and momentum of dreams coming to fruit : ) Thinking big. Loving large. Powering the imagination. Women are rising again.”

Here is the intro on the back cover, which says it beautifully. Here’s why you need to read this book! Please order it and buy copies for your friends, libraries, schools, jazz cafes. By doing so you will be helping to support the next stage of our journey – you too will be ‘giving birth to sound!’

”Giving Birth to Sound is about Her-story as told by some of the most brilliant and creative women musicians in the world. Individual thinkers and movers who have been brave enough to devote their lives to the making of music the way they hear it. They were not afraid to sing and speak in the name of sound, showing us that they are a family of unique individuals, separate but united. Read their words and listen to their music whenever you can – it will take you even closer to the great mystery called life.”
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   How to buy the book:
   http://www.buddysknife.de/our-titles/
   info@buddysknife.de
   Available on amazon.com and amazon.de.
Thank you for reading!

 

 

 

Giving Birth To Sound

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This month I am pleased and proud to announce that I am featured in this amazing book, Giving Birth To Sound. Created by specialist Cologne jazz publisher Buddys Knife and a host of contributors working in the field of music – not just jazz, but uniquely personal interpretations of jazz, improvisation and creative sound. The line-up includes some major artists of the 20th century, some of which have influenced and inspired me greatly. What an honour – and I can’t wait to see what happens next! Here is some background from the website:

”Renate Da Rin and William Parker have invited 48 creative women sound artists to share their experiences in the process of creating music and living as an artist. These women come from North and South America, Europe, Africa and Asia.”giving birth to sound” is about Her-story as told by some of the most brilliant and creative women musicians in the world. Individual thinkers and movers who have been brave enough to devote their lives to the making of music the way they hear it. They were not afraid to sing and speak in the name of sound, showing us that they are a family of unique individuals, separate but united.

Read their words and listen to their music whenever you can – it will take you even closer to the great mystery called life. Foreword by Amina Claudine Myers.

Among the great musicians we find Jay Clayton, Marilyn Crispell, Claudine François, Terry Jenoure, Joëlle Léandre, Marilyn Mazur, Nicole Mitchell, Maggie Nicols, Angelika Niescier, Lisa Sokolov, Ijeoma Chinue Thomas, Fay Victor, Jessica Williams … ”

Excited? Like a copy of the book? CLICK HERE  to order.

 


 

 

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The ‘Woodshed’

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(Image from The Girls in The Band.)

The ‘woodshed’. That place where jazzers go to practice. How to explain to friends, family, loved ones and significant others, (and even some fellow musicians), the sovereignty, the absolute non-negotiable sanctity of the woodshed? How to really convey this?

I spend hours and hours and hours alone, in a room with myself and my instrument (s). And I love it. I think I love it more than anything or anyone. Only the pure ecstasy of performing – of going to the other end of the scale, of  extrovert, gregarious all out curtain-up showtime beats it. Very little else. Anyone who has had to fight for this sacred chunk of devoted artistic time can recognise its true value. Painters and writers know. Also nuns, monks, hermits, ascetics, celibates and renunciates.

Things I might do in the ‘woodshed’ might include the following: composition/arrangement, then drilling through and memorising guitar parts for various solo or collaborative projects. Or, maybe the world has literally DISAPPEARED because a song is coming through, coaxing, teasing or exploding its way through the veil. For me, new music comes unbidden, uninvited and with extravagant pomp and splendour. An idea grabs onto a random hook or scale that I was practising anyway, then not just one song but 4, then a surrounding concept album are suddenly THERE, all at once, demanding refinement. It’s a visceral experience of birthing something that will have its way and just HAS to come through. A feeling both ravenous and ravening. Or I might be just in a hypnotic grip of scales and arpeggios, diminished  and major 7ths all up and down the fretboard. Stamina for hands and fingers. For ages. Or the geeky joy of 2 handed tapping in kind of Nu metal/classical way that is frank and pure indulgence. People might fairly observe that playing guitar or indeed anything on your own for hours is kind of wanky. Well, maybe, but we all need that too. For myself, I feel an intense kind of dialogue  with music as a companion and the instrument as a partner that gives back exactly what I give out.

But yes, it’s a love affair.

The woodshed is about more than practice and preparation. (These are of course, essential, but as we know, can be overdone at the expense of spontaneity and creativity onstage, in the moment.) It’s about maintaining a bedrock of physical and technical ease. Being good to go. It’s about knowing the material backwards. Being able to tap into that wellspring of  energy. I cannot feel good about stepping onstage, unless I know I have taken care of my practice. I have to connect with that source every day, if possible. It’s nothing less than a spiritual discipline. Even though I also do a fair bit of staring into space, dreaming and scratching my head…

I could rhapsodise further but…the woodshed calls…’bye for now.

 

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(Trombone player, Melba Liston featured in The Girls in The Band.) 

 The Girls in the Band is a documentary by director Judy Chaikin. Contains glorious archive footage of the great female jazz bands of the ’40’s as well as interviews and music from contemporary musicians. Enjoy this trailer and track down the full film if you can!

 


 

 

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